Images of RFID Tags



 

Example of an Alien/RAFSEC "I" tag.
This tag is very thin, and could be virtually undetectable when sandwiched between paper or inserted under the innersole of a shoe.


Example of an Alien/RAFSEC "C" tag.


Example of an Alien/RAFSEC "I" tag
placed inside the cap of a Procter & Gamble Pantene shampoo bottle.

 



Example of Alien/RAFSEC "C" tag inside box. 


Example of an Alien/RAFSEC "S" tag.
Yes, metal can interfere with RFID, but developers have found ways to make the metal of cans work with the antenna.
 


Alien/RAFSEC "S" tag
embedded between the layers of a dog food bag.
 


The six images above can be seen along with other information in a mirror copy of an MIT Auto-ID Center EPC Symposium slide show entitled "Lessons Learned in the Real World." See http://cryptome.org/rfid/rfid-field-test.pdf . 


Example of Matrics loyalty card chip.
RFID proponents would like to see all loyalty cards, ATM cards and other ID's RFID enabled with chips like this. Imagine! Banks, retailers, supermarkets and governments could find out everything about you when you walk past a reader device since line-of-sight is not necessary to access the information. The radio waves could go right through your pants and through your wallet to get the information on the card's chip. Imagine how valuable it would be for businesses to determine who is worth serving and who should be ignored!

 



One more tag.
Can't remember who makes this one, but it shows another example of a thin RFID tag that could be virtually undetectable when sandwiched between paper or cardboard. Note that the solid red dot is the chip. The lines running out from the chip are the antenna. This is a typical configuration. You can see the chip and antennas in the examples above, too.

 

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