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October 5, 2006

Schwarzenegger's Support of RFID Tracking Technology No Shock

Arnold.jpg

Governor Schwarzenegger's veto of a bill aimed at protecting California citizens from surreptitious RFID tracking should come as no shock if you understand his penchant for paternalistic power.

In a 1990 U.S. News interview he was quoted as saying "My relationship to power and authority is that I'm all for it. People need somebody to watch over them. Ninety-five percent of the people in the world need to be told what to do and how to behave."

Senate Bill 768, known as the Identity Information Protection Act of 2006, was passed by state legislators last month. It was drafted to prohibit abusive tracking of people through RFID tags and give Californians control over personal information stored on RFID-laced identity documents.

Among other things, the bill would have provided "... that a person or entity that intentionally remotely reads or attempts to remotely read a person’s identification document using radio waves without his or her knowledge and prior consent...shall be punished by imprisonment in a county jail for up to one year, a fine of not more than $5,000, or both that fine and imprisonment." (See http://info.sen.ca.gov/pub/bill/sen/sb_0751-0800/sb_768_bill_20060901_enrolled.pdf)

Schwarzenegger was apparently aware that his failure to sign the bill could open the door to more Big Brother surveillance on California soil. He issued a statement explaining that he vetoed the bill because it could conflict with new government standards for identity documents like those to be issued for driver's licenses under the Real ID Act. (See http://gov.ca.gov/pdf/press/sb_768_veto.pdf)

The Real ID Act, passed in the spring of 2005, gives the Department of Homeland Security the right to set new federal driver's license standards. Privacy advocates and civil libertarians are not only concerned that these new standards will create a de facto national ID, but that this national ID will contain remotely readable RFID tags.

Homeland Security is already testing RFID tags in visitor documents, and it is on record as shopping for a very powerful form of the technology that could allow law enforcement to read documents secured in purses, wallets and even in cars speeding by at 55 miles per hour.

It wouldn't surprise me if the governor has already read our book "Spychips" and understands how RFID technology could be used to track, monitor, and control citizens. He's just the sort of character who would find added value in RFID deep organ implants for humans and IBM's RFID-based "PERSON TRACKING UNIT" that can follow people in places like shopping malls, libraries, theaters, museums, elevators and even restrooms. Why, with that kind of power, he could most certainly keep track of the 95 percent of his constituents that he seems to believe need close supervision and instructions on proper behavior.

For more on this story, see Martin Bosworth's article Schwarzenegger Terminates Spychip Bill at www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2006/10/ca_spychips.html
and
Arnie Terminates RFID Bill at www.theregister.co.uk/2006/10/05/california_rfid_bill_terminated/

-- Liz McIntyre

Posted by liz at October 5, 2006 3:01 PM

Comments

Having an Austrian as head of a state other than his native Austria has proven fatal before...

Posted by: GermanCitizen at October 7, 2006 9:29 PM

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